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A recent report from EcoWatch.com has warned Americans that mosquito-borne

Increasing Mosquito Disease Danger Days

August 23, 2018

A recent report from EcoWatch.com has warned Americans that mosquito-borne "disease danger days" are on the rise across the country. This finding comes from an analysis at Climate Central, which examined temperature trends and compared them to the temperature ranges of disease transmission.

Temperature Affects Disease Transmission

The analysis found that an elevated risk of mosquito-borne disease transmission exists when temperatures are between 61 degrees and 93 degrees Fahrenheit. Why? Because, according to the analysis, temperature affects the viability of mosquitos and directly contributes to their survival. Optimal temperatures cause these pests to thrive. Increasing temperatures also shortens the "Extrinsic Incubation Period" (EIP), which is a fancy way of describing how long it takes for a virus to develop inside an insect.

Northern and Southern States are Affected

Ninety-four percent of the 244 cities studied are now experiencing more "danger days" since 1970. The cities with the largest increase in danger days were ranked: the top five cities included Reno, NV; San Francisco; Santa Maria, CA; Las Cruces, NM and El Paso, TX. Northern states are also experiencing increased danger days. States such as Montana, Pennsylvania, Michigan, New York and Vermont have also seen a jump in the increased climate dangers of vector-borne transmission.

Mosquitos and Vector-Born Diseases

It is well established that mosquitos carry "vector-borne" diseases throughout the U.S. A total of nine reportable diseases are carried by American mosquitos. These diseases range from mildly annoying to deadly, and include West Nile virus, dengue, Zika, chikungunya, Yellow Fever, St. Louis Encephalitis and Eastern Equine Encephalitis viruses. Although some of these illnesses are mostly found in U.S. territories such as Puerto Rico, the continental U.S. has seen an influx of Zika, dengue and chikungunya viruses in Hawaii, Florida and Texas.

The Takeaway: Protect Yourself

What does this mean for you? First and foremost, it means that extra vigilance is needed to protect you and your family. Avoid outdoor areas when mosquitos are most active, such as early morning or in the evenings. Stay covered by wearing long sleeves and long pants as well as light-colored clothing can help as well.

MosquitoNix® products and services are also excellent ways to protect your family in your own backyard and beyond. From our MosquitoNix Misting System to our portable, on-the-go options, our products will cover you quickly and easily anywhere you go! Contact us today for more information about how you can decrease your own personal "danger days," and keep yourself safe and healthy.

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